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Showing posts with label Attractions. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Attractions. Show all posts

Friday, March 3, 2017

Japan Travel Fair

Japan Travel Fair to promote destinations outside Tokyo, Osaka

Wakayama is one of the destinations slated to be promoted in the upcoming Japan Travel Fair in Jakarta. 
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 The Japan Travel Fair is set to return for the seventh time to the Kota Kasablanka Mall in South Jakarta on March 3 to 5.
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Six destinations are set to be highlighted at the event, namely the Kyushu (Fukuoka, Kagoshima, Kumamoto, Miyazaki, Nagasaki, Oita and Saga), Okinawa, Setouchi (Ehime, Hiroshima, Kagawa and Okayama), Tohoku (Akita, Aomori, Iwate, Miyagi and Yamagata), Wakayama and Hokkaido areas.
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“Tokyo and Osaka have already become the most popular destinations among Indonesian travelers. This year, we want them to visit other places in Japan,” Japan National Tourism Organization (JNTO) for Jakarta executive director Hideki Tomioka said in a press conference in South Jakarta on Thursday. He added that the selected destinations were equipped with adequate infrastructure and the local administrations and travel agents were keen to tap into the Indonesian market and were set to participate in the fair to promote their attractions.
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The Tohoku region, for instance, an area still recovering from the 2011 earthquake that had damaged nuclear plant reactors in Fukushima, is said to attend the event to promote places it deemed safe for tourists. Meanwhile, Okinawa is described as a "popular resort destination among local and overseas travelers" that is still foreign to Indonesian tourists, with attractions like picturesque beaches and diving spots.
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isitors of the event can also expect to enjoy discounts from participating airlines, travel agents and partnering banks, with the lowest price for return tickets reportedly Rp 3.9 million (US$292).
The travel fair is part of Japan's effort to attract 40 million foreign visitors from all around the world by the 2020 Olympics in Tokyo. Last year, up to 271,000 Indonesians reportedly visited the country, representing a 32.1 percent growth from 2015.
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Friday, August 28, 2015

Beach chairs back on #Phuket sands


PHUKET: After months of indecision and false-steps in the creation of new beach rules for Phuket, the governor yesterday announced a final solution to the island’s beach chair drama.

“There will be slight modifications to the 10 per cent zone system that has been in place up to this point,” explained Governor Nisit Jansomwong. “Beachgoers will be allowed to bring their own chairs, umbrellas and mats, while rental operators will only be allowed to provide mats and umbrellas. However, everyone must keep their beach furniture within the marked 10 per cent zones.”

Rental operators cannot stake claims to any part of the beach with unoccupied mats and will not be allowed to rent out chairs to most visitors. Nonetheless, exceptions will be made, such as for the elderly and disabled, confirmed Governor Nisit.

However, such a loophole in the system is open for abuse, as the governor did not address in the meeting who would be available to rent out chairs to the disabled and elderly or who would be in charge of making the judgment call of who is qualified.

Policies for other beach vendors were also laid out during the meeting.

“There will be no food or cigarettes sold on the beach, while non-alcoholic drinks will be allowed,” said Gov Nisit. “Vendors supplying other goods, such as souvenirs, fireworks or Chinese lanterns will not be allowed.”

Masseuses will be allowed to work within a designated area and there will be no change in policy for operators running marine activities, such as jet-skiing and parasailing, confirmed Gov Nisit.

The announced plan was backed by months of research conducted by the Prince of Songkhla University’s Phuket Beach Management Research team.

“Our team, comprising professional, non-biased researchers, spoke with all stakeholders before putting forth our suggestion,” said Pun Thongchumnum, head of the research team.

The research identified six major stakeholders: tourists, 75 per cent of those spoken to were westerners; beach vendors of all types, as well as local tourism authorities; locals, both those inland and in beach communities; high-ranking members of the local governments; honorary consuls; and the online community.

“Based on the interviews we conducted with tourists arriving and departing Phuket, the number one priority was clean beaches. This was followed by ‘pure nature’ and facilities, with beach activities being the lowest priority,” said Dr Pun.

After speaking with interested parties, the research group was able to divide the facilities category into two groups: paid and unpaid.

“Most wanted to be able to use umbrellas and sunbeds, while having access to beverages – all as paid services. The most important unpaid service was security,”

It has yet to be seen if the recently launched Phuket Beach Police units will fulfill this need (story here).

The study also found that many local people and vendors still disagreed with the 10 per cent zoning system. However, researches suggested that they coordinate their efforts to work together under the provincial beach management committee. - See more at: http://www.phuketgazette.net/phuket-news/Beach-chairs-back-Phuket-sands/61832#ad-image-0
#PHUKET: After months of indecision and false-steps in the creation of new beach rules for Phuket, the governor yesterday announced a final solution to the island’s beach chair drama.

“There will be slight modifications to the 10 per cent zone system that has been in place up to this point,” explained Governor Nisit Jansomwong. “Beachgoers will be allowed to bring their own chairs, umbrellas and mats, while rental operators will only be allowed to provide mats and umbrellas. However, everyone must keep their beach furniture within the marked 10 per cent zones.”

Rental operators cannot stake claims to any part of the beach with unoccupied mats and will not be allowed to rent out chairs to most visitors. Nonetheless, exceptions will be made, such as for the elderly and disabled, confirmed Governor Nisit.

However, such a loophole in the system is open for abuse, as the governor did not address in the meeting who would be available to rent out chairs to the disabled and elderly or who would be in charge of making the judgment call of who is qualified.

Policies for other beach vendors were also laid out during the meeting.

“There will be no food or cigarettes sold on the beach, while non-alcoholic drinks will be allowed,” said Gov Nisit. “Vendors supplying other goods, such as souvenirs, fireworks or Chinese lanterns will not be allowed.”

Masseuses will be allowed to work within a designated area and there will be no change in policy for operators running marine activities, such as jet-skiing and parasailing, confirmed Gov Nisit.

The announced plan was backed by months of research conducted by the Prince of Songkhla University’s Phuket Beach Management Research team.

“Our team, comprising professional, non-biased researchers, spoke with all stakeholders before putting forth our suggestion,” said Pun Thongchumnum, head of the research team.

The research identified six major stakeholders: tourists, 75 per cent of those spoken to were westerners; beach vendors of all types, as well as local tourism authorities; locals, both those inland and in beach communities; high-ranking members of the local governments; honorary consuls; and the online community.

“Based on the interviews we conducted with tourists arriving and departing Phuket, the number one priority was clean beaches. This was followed by ‘pure nature’ and facilities, with beach activities being the lowest priority,” said Dr Pun.

After speaking with interested parties, the research group was able to divide the facilities category into two groups: paid and unpaid.

“Most wanted to be able to use umbrellas and sunbeds, while having access to beverages – all as paid services. The most important unpaid service was security,”

It has yet to be seen if the recently launched Phuket Beach Police units will fulfill this need (story here).

The study also found that many local people and vendors still disagreed with the 10 per cent zoning system. However, researches suggested that they coordinate their efforts to work together under the provincial beach management committee.

Source: PhuketGazette
 
 
 
PHUKET: After months of indecision and false-steps in the creation of new beach rules for Phuket, the governor yesterday announced a final solution to the island’s beach chair drama.

“There will be slight modifications to the 10 per cent zone system that has been in place up to this point,” explained Governor Nisit Jansomwong. “Beachgoers will be allowed to bring their own chairs, umbrellas and mats, while rental operators will only be allowed to provide mats and umbrellas. However, everyone must keep their beach furniture within the marked 10 per cent zones.”

Rental operators cannot stake claims to any part of the beach with unoccupied mats and will not be allowed to rent out chairs to most visitors. Nonetheless, exceptions will be made, such as for the elderly and disabled, confirmed Governor Nisit.

However, such a loophole in the system is open for abuse, as the governor did not address in the meeting who would be available to rent out chairs to the disabled and elderly or who would be in charge of making the judgment call of who is qualified.

Policies for other beach vendors were also laid out during the meeting.

“There will be no food or cigarettes sold on the beach, while non-alcoholic drinks will be allowed,” said Gov Nisit. “Vendors supplying other goods, such as souvenirs, fireworks or Chinese lanterns will not be allowed.”

Masseuses will be allowed to work within a designated area and there will be no change in policy for operators running marine activities, such as jet-skiing and parasailing, confirmed Gov Nisit.

The announced plan was backed by months of research conducted by the Prince of Songkhla University’s Phuket Beach Management Research team.

“Our team, comprising professional, non-biased researchers, spoke with all stakeholders before putting forth our suggestion,” said Pun Thongchumnum, head of the research team.

The research identified six major stakeholders: tourists, 75 per cent of those spoken to were westerners; beach vendors of all types, as well as local tourism authorities; locals, both those inland and in beach communities; high-ranking members of the local governments; honorary consuls; and the online community.

“Based on the interviews we conducted with tourists arriving and departing Phuket, the number one priority was clean beaches. This was followed by ‘pure nature’ and facilities, with beach activities being the lowest priority,” said Dr Pun.

After speaking with interested parties, the research group was able to divide the facilities category into two groups: paid and unpaid.

“Most wanted to be able to use umbrellas and sunbeds, while having access to beverages – all as paid services. The most important unpaid service was security,”

It has yet to be seen if the recently launched Phuket Beach Police units will fulfill this need (story here).

The study also found that many local people and vendors still disagreed with the 10 per cent zoning system. However, researches suggested that they coordinate their efforts to work together under the provincial beach management committee. - See more at: http://www.phuketgazette.net/phuket-news/Beach-chairs-back-Phuket-sands/61832#ad-image-0

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Flying Hanuman Adventure, #Phuket

Flying Hanuman is an adventure
like no other on Phuket.
It shows that the island’s beauty
goes far beyond the sea, sun and sand
that it is famous for. The hillsides of Phuket overflow
with thick forest that is great for exploration and outdoor activities.


What Flying Hanuman aimed to achieve was to provide travellers
with exceptional service, enjoyment, excitement and memories without
impacting the natural balance within the forest environment surrounding it.
There is no better way to take in the other face of the Pearl of the Andaman.
 


The site of Flying Hanuman stand almost exactly as it did before construction began.
A wide variety of trees and small animals occupy the 80,000 square metre plot,
and the natural rubber trees are harvested by locals
who are still allowed to live on the hillside. A small creek runs through the land
during the wet months and even the trees within
Flying Hanuman’s reception area have been left untouched.



Flying Hanuman is an adventure because it is part of the forest that surrounds it.
Great care has been used to make sure the zipline adventure
does not have a negative effect on the trees
it uses and the species who call the area their home.
It took hard work to put the course into place, but once it was done,
the forest is what makes the attraction so special.





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Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Tham Morakot, Trang


Tham Morakot one of the fantastic attractions of the Unseen in Thailand
is located at the west of Ko Muk. The exciting journey to Morakot Cave besides
seeing the marvelous nature creation is the way to reach the cave by swimming
one by one into the entrance of the cave.


This can allow only a small boat to pass through during low tide along
the channel of 80 metres long. After passing the entrance to the other side,
one will stand at the large hall roofed by the sky looking like standing
inside the very large funnel. The sand beach will be seen in the middle to the hall
surrounded by high cliffs. Some species of plant are found either on the beach


The sunlight during midday will be straight through the mouth of the funnel.
The reflection of the sea creates the emerald color
as the name “Morakot Cave” which means ”Emerald Cave”.


Tham Morakot is visited by swimming or by small inflatable boats.
Starting from a ship, the swimmer has to enter the cave
until he reaches a water filled chamber,
which is lit by sunlight through a hole in the ceiling.
The entrance passage is rather small and low,
and it is passable only during low tide.


The name of the cave means Emerald Cave.
It describes the emerald colour produced by sunlight filtered through sea water.
Inside the cave is a secluded beach of white sand.


To get to Ko Muk and Morakot Cave, boat service leaves Kuan Tung Ku Pier
at 08.00 hr everyday charging 40 baht per person.
One trip by the rented boat will charge 400 baht and takes 30 minutes to Ko Muk.


Upon arrival at Sapanyao Pier in front of the island,
one have to rent a long-tailed boat to Morakot Cave rested
at the other side of the island (100 baht each).
Another way is to rent the boat from Pak Meng Pier
straight to Morakot Cave at Ko Muk.
The rate is 1,800 baht/day taking about 40 minutes.


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