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Showing posts with label Island. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Island. Show all posts

Thursday, March 9, 2017

Lombok to welcome thousands of cruise passengers in 2017

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The tourism industry in Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara (NTB), is looking forward to welcoming for 24 cruise ships expected to make fast on the island this year and bring in thousands of tourists through the Lembar seaport.
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The shipping companies behind the 24 vessels had confirmed the planned stops in Lombok, NTB Tourism Agency head Lalu Muhammad Faozal said, adding that the number marked an in...

Tuesday, September 15, 2015

Klong Prao Resort, Koh Chang


Klong Prao Resort is located along the white sandy beach on Koh Chang Island. It features 2 restaurants, an outdoor pool and rooms with balconies. Free WiFi and parking are provided.


 The spacious rooms at Resort Klong Prao come with modern décor and hardwood flooring. Rooms feature views of the sea or garden, and are equipped with satellite TV. A minibar and tea/coffee maker are also provided.


To relax, guests can laze in the sauna or arrange for diving trips. The hotel provides car rental and airport shuttle services. Dry cleaning services are available upon request.


 Thai specialities and Western dishes are served at Rim Had and Fueng Fa Restaurant.


 Klong Prao Resort is a 20-minute drive from Ao Tammachart Pier and a 1-hour drive from Chantaburi Town.


Klong Prao Beach is a great choice for travellers interested in Tranquility, Seafood and Beach

*****
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Friday, August 28, 2015

Beach chairs back on #Phuket sands


PHUKET: After months of indecision and false-steps in the creation of new beach rules for Phuket, the governor yesterday announced a final solution to the island’s beach chair drama.

“There will be slight modifications to the 10 per cent zone system that has been in place up to this point,” explained Governor Nisit Jansomwong. “Beachgoers will be allowed to bring their own chairs, umbrellas and mats, while rental operators will only be allowed to provide mats and umbrellas. However, everyone must keep their beach furniture within the marked 10 per cent zones.”

Rental operators cannot stake claims to any part of the beach with unoccupied mats and will not be allowed to rent out chairs to most visitors. Nonetheless, exceptions will be made, such as for the elderly and disabled, confirmed Governor Nisit.

However, such a loophole in the system is open for abuse, as the governor did not address in the meeting who would be available to rent out chairs to the disabled and elderly or who would be in charge of making the judgment call of who is qualified.

Policies for other beach vendors were also laid out during the meeting.

“There will be no food or cigarettes sold on the beach, while non-alcoholic drinks will be allowed,” said Gov Nisit. “Vendors supplying other goods, such as souvenirs, fireworks or Chinese lanterns will not be allowed.”

Masseuses will be allowed to work within a designated area and there will be no change in policy for operators running marine activities, such as jet-skiing and parasailing, confirmed Gov Nisit.

The announced plan was backed by months of research conducted by the Prince of Songkhla University’s Phuket Beach Management Research team.

“Our team, comprising professional, non-biased researchers, spoke with all stakeholders before putting forth our suggestion,” said Pun Thongchumnum, head of the research team.

The research identified six major stakeholders: tourists, 75 per cent of those spoken to were westerners; beach vendors of all types, as well as local tourism authorities; locals, both those inland and in beach communities; high-ranking members of the local governments; honorary consuls; and the online community.

“Based on the interviews we conducted with tourists arriving and departing Phuket, the number one priority was clean beaches. This was followed by ‘pure nature’ and facilities, with beach activities being the lowest priority,” said Dr Pun.

After speaking with interested parties, the research group was able to divide the facilities category into two groups: paid and unpaid.

“Most wanted to be able to use umbrellas and sunbeds, while having access to beverages – all as paid services. The most important unpaid service was security,”

It has yet to be seen if the recently launched Phuket Beach Police units will fulfill this need (story here).

The study also found that many local people and vendors still disagreed with the 10 per cent zoning system. However, researches suggested that they coordinate their efforts to work together under the provincial beach management committee. - See more at: http://www.phuketgazette.net/phuket-news/Beach-chairs-back-Phuket-sands/61832#ad-image-0
#PHUKET: After months of indecision and false-steps in the creation of new beach rules for Phuket, the governor yesterday announced a final solution to the island’s beach chair drama.

“There will be slight modifications to the 10 per cent zone system that has been in place up to this point,” explained Governor Nisit Jansomwong. “Beachgoers will be allowed to bring their own chairs, umbrellas and mats, while rental operators will only be allowed to provide mats and umbrellas. However, everyone must keep their beach furniture within the marked 10 per cent zones.”

Rental operators cannot stake claims to any part of the beach with unoccupied mats and will not be allowed to rent out chairs to most visitors. Nonetheless, exceptions will be made, such as for the elderly and disabled, confirmed Governor Nisit.

However, such a loophole in the system is open for abuse, as the governor did not address in the meeting who would be available to rent out chairs to the disabled and elderly or who would be in charge of making the judgment call of who is qualified.

Policies for other beach vendors were also laid out during the meeting.

“There will be no food or cigarettes sold on the beach, while non-alcoholic drinks will be allowed,” said Gov Nisit. “Vendors supplying other goods, such as souvenirs, fireworks or Chinese lanterns will not be allowed.”

Masseuses will be allowed to work within a designated area and there will be no change in policy for operators running marine activities, such as jet-skiing and parasailing, confirmed Gov Nisit.

The announced plan was backed by months of research conducted by the Prince of Songkhla University’s Phuket Beach Management Research team.

“Our team, comprising professional, non-biased researchers, spoke with all stakeholders before putting forth our suggestion,” said Pun Thongchumnum, head of the research team.

The research identified six major stakeholders: tourists, 75 per cent of those spoken to were westerners; beach vendors of all types, as well as local tourism authorities; locals, both those inland and in beach communities; high-ranking members of the local governments; honorary consuls; and the online community.

“Based on the interviews we conducted with tourists arriving and departing Phuket, the number one priority was clean beaches. This was followed by ‘pure nature’ and facilities, with beach activities being the lowest priority,” said Dr Pun.

After speaking with interested parties, the research group was able to divide the facilities category into two groups: paid and unpaid.

“Most wanted to be able to use umbrellas and sunbeds, while having access to beverages – all as paid services. The most important unpaid service was security,”

It has yet to be seen if the recently launched Phuket Beach Police units will fulfill this need (story here).

The study also found that many local people and vendors still disagreed with the 10 per cent zoning system. However, researches suggested that they coordinate their efforts to work together under the provincial beach management committee.

Source: PhuketGazette
 
 
 
PHUKET: After months of indecision and false-steps in the creation of new beach rules for Phuket, the governor yesterday announced a final solution to the island’s beach chair drama.

“There will be slight modifications to the 10 per cent zone system that has been in place up to this point,” explained Governor Nisit Jansomwong. “Beachgoers will be allowed to bring their own chairs, umbrellas and mats, while rental operators will only be allowed to provide mats and umbrellas. However, everyone must keep their beach furniture within the marked 10 per cent zones.”

Rental operators cannot stake claims to any part of the beach with unoccupied mats and will not be allowed to rent out chairs to most visitors. Nonetheless, exceptions will be made, such as for the elderly and disabled, confirmed Governor Nisit.

However, such a loophole in the system is open for abuse, as the governor did not address in the meeting who would be available to rent out chairs to the disabled and elderly or who would be in charge of making the judgment call of who is qualified.

Policies for other beach vendors were also laid out during the meeting.

“There will be no food or cigarettes sold on the beach, while non-alcoholic drinks will be allowed,” said Gov Nisit. “Vendors supplying other goods, such as souvenirs, fireworks or Chinese lanterns will not be allowed.”

Masseuses will be allowed to work within a designated area and there will be no change in policy for operators running marine activities, such as jet-skiing and parasailing, confirmed Gov Nisit.

The announced plan was backed by months of research conducted by the Prince of Songkhla University’s Phuket Beach Management Research team.

“Our team, comprising professional, non-biased researchers, spoke with all stakeholders before putting forth our suggestion,” said Pun Thongchumnum, head of the research team.

The research identified six major stakeholders: tourists, 75 per cent of those spoken to were westerners; beach vendors of all types, as well as local tourism authorities; locals, both those inland and in beach communities; high-ranking members of the local governments; honorary consuls; and the online community.

“Based on the interviews we conducted with tourists arriving and departing Phuket, the number one priority was clean beaches. This was followed by ‘pure nature’ and facilities, with beach activities being the lowest priority,” said Dr Pun.

After speaking with interested parties, the research group was able to divide the facilities category into two groups: paid and unpaid.

“Most wanted to be able to use umbrellas and sunbeds, while having access to beverages – all as paid services. The most important unpaid service was security,”

It has yet to be seen if the recently launched Phuket Beach Police units will fulfill this need (story here).

The study also found that many local people and vendors still disagreed with the 10 per cent zoning system. However, researches suggested that they coordinate their efforts to work together under the provincial beach management committee. - See more at: http://www.phuketgazette.net/phuket-news/Beach-chairs-back-Phuket-sands/61832#ad-image-0

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Vegetarian Festival, #Phuket.


The Phuket Vegetarian Festival
is a colourful event held
over a nine-day period in October,
celebrating the Chinese community’s belief
that abstinence from meat


Various stimulants during the ninth lunar month of the Chinese calendar
will help them obtain good health and peace of mind.


Though the origins of the festival are unclear,
it is commonly thought that the festival was bought to Phuket
by a wandering Chinese opera group who fell ill with malaria while performing on the island.


They decided to adhere to a strict vegetarian diet and pray to the Nine Emperor Gods
to ensure purification of the mind and body.
To everyone’s amazement the opera group made a complete recovery.


The people celebrated by holding a festival that was meant to honour the gods
as well as express the people’s happiness at surviving what was,
in the 19th century, a fatal illness.


Subsequently the festival has grown and developed into a spectacular yearly
event that is attended by thousands with participants flying
in from China and other Asian destinations.


One of the most exciting aspects of the festival are the various,
(and sometimes gruesome) ceremonies which are held to invoke the gods.
Fire walking, body piercing and other acts of self mortification undertaken
by participants acting as mediums of the gods, have become more spectacula.


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